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Monthly Archives: April 2008

“There’s free software and then there‚Äôs open source,” he suggested, noting that Microsoft gives away its software in developing countries. With open source software, on the other hand, “there is this thing called the GPL, which we disagree with.” Open source, he said, creates a license “so that nobody can ever improve the software,” he claimed, bemoaning the squandered opportunity for jobs and business. (Yes, Linux fans, we’re aware of how distorted this definition is.) He went back to the analogy of pharmaceuticals: “I think if you invent drugs, you should be able to charge for them,” he said, adding with a shrug: “That may seem radical.”

Full article at Ars Technica.

We do just fine “improving our software”… Linux continues upward while Microsoft’s latest blunder is an expensive one. It looks more like GPL is promoting the jobs and opportunities he speaks of tenfold, while a stagnant business model is slowly killing Microsoft. There is no intention nor desire to give up on free software from the members of the community… but Microsoft is feeling the pressure… they are slowly giving way to our model.

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The new version of Ubuntu affectionately codenamed Hardy Heron has been officially released. It’s a Long Term Support release (the second that Ubuntu has had), which means three years of security updates for the desktop (5 years for the server). You might want to hold off for a few days to upgrade as I’m doing because the servers are naturally, quite busy.

The Ubuntu community provides an easy walkthrough for upgrading and they’ve got a very smooth screenshot walkthrough for Kubuntu as well.

The new Ubuntu provides the latest software versions from the open source stream, like X.org 7.3, 2.6.24 Linux kernel, and GNOME 2.22. The PolicyKit framework has been integrated into Ubuntu’s administration windows, allowing the assignment of fine-grained administration permissions to normal users. This way, if you need your friend to change, say, your display settings, you won’t need to enter your password for him or divulge it outright in plain earsight of your mortal enemies.

Kubuntu is offering both KDE 3.5.9 (commercially supported by Canonical) and KDE 4.0.3.